Charades End

It’s 4:30 AM. I’ve been awake for about an hour. I screwed up my neck again, somehow, and the pain is considerable.

My neighbor is also awake. He’s a crazy guy from Iceland named Ludwig. I’m not sure he ever sleeps. He looks like he’s about eighty, and he listens to loud Icelandic rap music all day long.

Yeah, I didn’t know that existed either.

My wife has been reading my stories, so in about a week or so she’ll probably ask me to kill Ludwig, now that she knows I used to be a hitman…

I’ve decided I’m going to finish this story today, and then I’m retiring from writing.

Well, for awhile, anyway.

I need to get back to my life, and say goodbye to this chapter of my life. I’m not sure what inspired me to start writing this, but this thing has become like unto an infection inside me, and I have to get it out. I was reluctant to start this story. I knew it would be painful, but I had no idea how just much it would hurt.

To the Muse that has been compelling me, I say, Avaunt, and be gone. Leave me in peace. I have done your bidding. I can only hope there was a good reason for me to do this.

* * * *

One of the unique aspects of this story at the time was Shorty and I didn’t have the same experiences. I went to Oklahoma, he didn’t. Shorty didn’t miss any opportunities with Hillary, I evidently missed all of them. He ventured out into the thunderstorm from hell with Martha, and I didn’t. And I haven’t tried to cover what happened to him that night. That’s probably a whole story in and of itself.

But I’m finishing this today. I’ll be brief.

* * * *

Shorty and Martha left the party as the sky opened up and the rain poured down. They made a brief pitstop at Martha’s apartment, maybe she wanted him to see it–I can’t remember the reason–then Martha was going to show Shorty some of the wonders of the Dallas night scene.

Martha took Shorty to her favorite bar, and that’s where Shorty’s plan of being alone with Martha fell apart. Martha, it seemed, had a reputation. If you had’ludes, you could probably have Martha. And just about every guy in Dallas seemed to know that. Her favorite bar was filled with a dozen guys that had brought handfuls of her favorite drug, and they were lined up at the door waiting for her to arrive.

Most of them were polite enough to leave her alone when they saw her with Shorty, but there was this one guy, let’s call him Craig, and he did not.

Craig was more than just one of Martha’s Friday night guys. I think Shorty said they had had a serious relationship at one point in time, and most likely, he wanted that back.

Cutting to the chase, Craig more or less abducted Martha of Dallas. Neither Shorty nor I would play the role of Paris. She went willingly against her will. I think that’s how Shorty described it. The pretext for the abduction of Martha was the bar they were in was lame, and Craig knew of a place just down the road that was the new hotspot in town. Martha would ride with Craig, and Shorty would follow in Martha’s car.

It was still raining like hell outside. Craig took off like an Indy racer, and in his haste to catch up, Shorty misjudged a turn and hit the raised concrete median dividing the road. He blew a tire, and bent the hell out of one the rims on Martha’s car. I think she drove a little cream colored Volvo. And yes. It was darling.

Shorty might be a master mechanic, but he is not a pit crew. By the time he had gotten Martha’s car off of the median, over to the side of the road, and changed the tire in the pouring rain–Craig and Martha were long gone.

Any other guy probably would’ve called it a night and gone home. But Shorty started canvassing any place that looked like a bar. He’d buy a beer, ask if anyone had seen a hot little blonde accompanied by an asshole, and what’s the name of that new hotspot place?

And that’s how Shorty ended up being broke, again. When he ran out of cash, he went back to Martha’s apartment. After all, he had her car and keys, and he needed to be there to let her in when she returned. Martha’s fridge was well stocked with beer, so Shorty started drinking while he waited for Martha to return.

He would wait for a very, very long time. There wouldn’t be a drop of liquor left in Martha’s apartment by the time she returned. He drank everything, and that’s why he looked like hell when he finally stumbled through the door on Saturday afternoon.

And that’s what got happened to Shorty when he won the Martha Lottery and incurred the Wrath of God by being in the wrong place at the right time and beating me to get to Martha first.

Like I said, I ended up getting the better end of that deal by ending up with Randi. That might be the only time in history when the guy who came in second actually ended up winning, unless you count the Tour de France.

Martha would eventually come home, also looking like hell, which I still cannot believe. Craig wanted a little somethin’-somethin’ from Martha, and possibly for the first time in her life, Martha said no. Craig told Martha he’d take her home once he got what he wanted. According to Martha, he was still waiting when he finally decided to take her home. Then Martha gave Shorty a ride to Michael and Hillary’s place. You know what got happened after that.

* * * *

Well, I woke up Sunday mornin’ with no way to hold my soul that didn’t hurt…

I’m not sure I actually woke up that morning. I would had to have gone to sleep first, and there was just way too much crap bouncing around inside of my head to let me do that.  I know I offered up a lots of prayers that night. I was sorely in need of some guidance.

The thoughts in my head finally stopped moving at the speed of light, and I was able to get a little rest. I was brought out of my reverie by the sound of footsteps. I could make out Hillary’s form tiptoeing across the living room, into the kitchen, where she picked up her car keys and then tiptoed toward the door.

“Going somewhere?” I asked, putting on my glasses so I could see. The sound of my voice startled the hell out of her two times. Man, she screamed, and damn near jumped out of her clothes and her skin. That still makes me laugh, now that I think about it. That’s the last good memory I have of Hillary.

“Jesus Christ! You scared me! I-I was just going to the…store. I need to buy some… tampons. I’ll be right back.” I waved goodbye, and rolled over to look at my knife collection. Just about everything in the apartment with a sharp edge or a point was hidden under the couch.

Shorty came out of the bedroom, wearing a pair of jeans and an upper torso of muscles and scars. I’m not sure how many surgeries he’d had after his motorcycle accident. A lots.

“Hillary left.” I said.

“And you just let her go? What did you do? Pull her distributor cap?”

“How did you know that?”

“I figured you had to do something. You’ve been two steps ahead of everyone since this whole thing got started.” He yawned a big yawn, and stretched.

“What are you talking about? This was your idea!” I said. I got up off the floor and followed him into the kitchen. He started making a pot of coffee.

“Nope. All I said was we needed a plan. I knew you’d come up with the rest. Man, that flash thing, that was beautiful!” he laughed.

“No! I feel like I’ve been drowning in quicksand! You don’t know what I went through before you got here! Hillary had a gun!”

“And who had it when I got here?”

I opened my mouth, but no words came out.

“Look, I’m a smart guy, but you’re so far beyond me, I’d never catch you if I spent the rest of my life in college. That’s what you should do.”

“What?”

“Go back to college. Get a degree. Get a life. Find yourself!”

Do you see now why I love this guy! Sonuvabitch! I’m going to start to cry…

I was too stunned to do much of anything but stare at him at the time. It took me a moment, but that’s when I realized Shorty knew more about me than I did. I had no response to Shorty’s assertion, so I changed the subject.

“Well, what do we do next?”

“I’ve been thinking about that. It won’t be as good as anything you could come up with, but I have an idea.” And we wouldn’t have to wait long to find out if his idea would work. The door flew open and the malevolent spirit of Hillary confronted us from the doorway.

“What did you bastards do to my car! It won’t start!”

“Don’t look at me. Look at him.” Shorty said.

“That’s it? That’s your idea?”

“You fuckers didn’t kill George, did you?”

“Nope.” Shorty replied.

“Godfuckingdammit! I knew it! Jesus! Why did I ever invite you two losers down here!”

“Because, we’re your friends, Hillary. Now, calm down and let us help you.”

“Fuck you!” Hillary screamed. “I’ll kill both of you, and then I’ll go kill George myself!” She stormed past us, into the kitchen. “Where are my goddamn knives!”

“Two steps ahead.” Shorty said. We exchanged a high five.

“Get out of here! Get out of my house!” she screamed.

“No.” Shorty replied, calmly.

“Get out, or I’ll call the police!”

“That’s a great idea. Call the cops.” I said, but I was not calm. “I have a story I’m dying to tell them!”

It was almost sad to see the fire go out of Hillary’s eyes. But it was also an huge relief.

“You need help, Hillary.” Shorty said. He didn’t leave any loopholes.

“I know, but, I don’t…know…what to do.” She looked completely and utterly defeated.

“We’re your friends.” Shorty said, and he went to hug her. “That’s why we’re here. Let us take care of it.”

“What–what are you going to do?”

“First, I’m going to make breakfast. Then we’re going to clean this place up, and then, we’ll figure it out.”

“Okay…” Hillary said, taking comfort where she could find it. It was a good thing Shorty was there for her.

I still wanted to kill her.

* * * *

Well, that’s just about the end of the story about my vacation in Dallas with Shorty. I only have a couple few several loose ends to tie up.

Shorty threw a bunch of stuff together from the leftovers of our epic party, cracked open about six eggs, and heated the concoction up in a skillet. It wasn’t the tastiest meal I’ve ever eaten, but it was warm and filling.

Shorty and Hillary attacked the pile of dishes in the kitchen and cleaned out the refrigerator. I tried to stay as far away from Hillary as I could, and decided to clean up the spacious party room.

Believe it or not, there was still beer in the keg! I have known a lots of kegs in my lifetime, but that keg is the only one I ever gave a name. Old Faithful would go down in history. It supplied the fuel for two epic parties, and still had enough gas to get Shorty and I through our last night in Dallas.

I brought the keg up to the apartment after I finished cleaning the party room, and put it on the balcony. A little ice, and it would be waiting for us after we completed the Herculanean task of helping Hillary help herself.

We would finally finish that sucker off at around 3:00 AM on Monday morning. And when she gave up her last glass of beer, we put our hands over our hearts in a moment of silence, and drank a toast to Old Faithful, the best damn keg that ever lived.

I gave Hillary all of her knives back after Shorty made her promise to stop trying to kill anybody, particularly me. But he kept one of Michael’s knives, just in cases.

Hillary was a humble Bumble for the reminder of our time together in Dallas. She retired to the bedroom after the kitchen was reasonably clean, and she mostly stayed there. Shorty would check on her from time to time. Like he said, he was her friend.

* * * *

Shorty’s plan to help Hillary was simple. He pulled Jerry’s card out of his wallet and dialed Jerry’s home number. Even he had trouble getting his wallet out of his pocket. Jerry wasn’t overly surprised to hear that Hillary had gone off the deep end.

“See? What did I tell you!” he said. Shorty and I listened to Jerry simultaneously. Shorty held the phone at an angle between our ears, and thanks to the natural volume of his voice, it was almost like being on a speakerphone.

But surprised wouldn’t even come close to describing Jerry’s reaction when Shorty mentioned the gun.

“Gun?!? What gun!!!”

“It’s a snub nose.38.” I said. Shorty had no idea what kind of gun it was beyond one of those pistol looking things.

“WHAT! THAT’S MY GUN!! THAT FUCKING BITCH STOLE MY GUN!!! Do not go ANYWHERE! I’m on my way over there! Jesus FUCKING Christ!!”

“Now what?” I decided to ask. After all, this was Shorty’s plan. He shrugged.

“We wait.”

Shorty decided it was a good time to take a shower. I decided it was a good time to smoke a joint, but I had maybe just enough weed remaining for one last joint, if I was lucky. I’d save that for after later, when we finally killed off the keg.

I took one of Hillary’s cigarettes and walked down to the parking lot. Jerry would no doubt want his gun back, and I was the only one that knew where it was. I grabbed Hillary’s keys and headed for her car.

As I closed the trunk, a car came speeding into the parking lot. It wasn’t Jerry. It was Bernie. I handed Jerry’s gun and bullets to Bernie. He quickly threw everything in his trunk.

“Jerry kept his gun in his office.” Bernie said, clearly disgusted that one of Jerry’s employees would do something like this. “Now, tell me what the fuck has been going on here!”

Bernie smoked two cigarettes as he listened to my story. He listened intently, never interrupting, until I got to the part where Hillary pointed the gun at my head.

“You said that! Jesus! Are you nuts! Holy shit! Were we ever wrong about you guys! We thought you came down here to kill George, but you end up saving his fucking life! Jesus!!”

I started telling him what Shorty and I did next. I think the only word to describe the look on his face might be bewildered. Thankfully, Shorty appeared. He wondered where I had wandered off to, and he helped me finish the story. I think the only thing Bernie could do by the time we finished was shake his head.

“Why the fuck didn’t you call the cops?”

See? I told you.

“Holy Christ! Man! Jesus! Jerry and I owe you one for this!” And that made Shorty smile.

Bernie thanked us a couple hundred times. He was going to see Jerry and tell him our story.

“Tell Jerry to call me when you see him. I need to talk to him.”

“Yeah, sure…”

Shorty was looking pretty good. He was smiling. He had a spring in his step. He put his arm around my shoulders and we headed back to the apartment.

“You should take a shower. You look like shit.” he laughed. I laughed my first real laugh since… I was with Randi!

Wow! Has it been that long? I wondered. It seemed so long ago…

* * * *

We were waiting by the phone when Jerry called. I had showered, done my hair and given myself a pedicure while we waited. Shorty held the phone between us again. We had no problem hearing Jerry.

“I’m going to fire her! Do you hear me! Fire her!”

“You can’t do that.” Shorty said.

“The fuck I can’t! Watch me!!”

“You owe me.” Shorty said, and then I knew why Shorty had started smiling. He was going to call in all of his markers if it meant it would save his friend.

What a guy!

“You? I don’t owe you shit! If I owe anyone it’s your hippie buddy over there. He’s the fucking hero!”

Shorty nugged me in the ribs. He was calling in all of my markers, too.

“Hey, Jerry, this is Shorty’s hippie buddy. You owe me.”

“Yeah? And what do you want from me?”

“Whatever Shorty wants, so try to be, you know, fuckin’ gracious and shit.”

There was a long silence. I’m pretty sure Jerry and Bernie were consulting one another, and probably a team of lawyers. Jerry was The Man. He always got what he wanted.

“Okay, guys. I’m listening. Name your terms.”

* * * *

Shorty’s terms were simple. There would be no charges filed against Hillary for stealing Jerry’s gun so she could kill George. Despite the seriousness of her intent, no one actually got dead, and Hillary was in an unstable state of mind. She needed treatment, not incarceration.

And there would be no charges filed against us for breaking and entering into George’s apartment and pretending to kill him to death.

That wasn’t even an issue, Jerry assured us. He had talked to George already. He thought George wanted to marry us.

Hillary would keep her job, and Jerry would pay for any and all treatment she would need to recover from her illness. That was all Shorty wanted from Jerry.

“Well, shit. Isn’t this a damn mess! Now I really can’t wait for you guys to get the hell out of here. You’re starting to cost me money. I don’t think I can afford having friends like you! Okay. Tentatively, we have a deal. Just make sure Hillary agrees to this. And if she argues about anything we agreed to, or gives me any shit, the deal’s off the table. I press charges, and she goes to jail. Understand?”

You know what I think?

I think everyone needs a friend like Shorty.

* * * *

Monday morning finally rolled around. Our flight back to Minnesota didn’t depart until something like 5:00 PM. We had plenty of time to take care of the last few items on our To Do List.

Shorty replaced the distributor cap on Hillary’s car. It started right up.

Check.

Shorty had talked to Hillary after he had concluded his negotiations with Jerry. Hillary then called Jerry and agreed to all the terms and conditions of the negotiated agreement, without so much as one bit of sass or lip. It was a first for both of them. Jerry told her to take Monday off. He had a few details to work out at the office concerning her continued presence, especially since the guy she had wanted to kill to death worked there, too.

Well, that was Jerry’s problem, but we had no doubt he’d be able to figure it out. In Jerry’s world, he always got what he wanted.

Hillary gave Shorty a big hug when we left, and she thanked him for everything he had done on her behalf. Shorty gave Hillary the knife he had held on to, just in cases, and we left the apartment for good. I watched from the doorway, luggage in hand. I didn’t even say goodbye. I would never see Hillary again, but I didn’t count that as an huge loss.

We drove Michael’s van, dropped off the keg and tap, collected our deposit, then drove to the office. Everyone stopped whatever they were doing to greet us. They knew all about the events that had transpired over the weekend, and Shorty was hailed as the hero that he was. He had done the impossible. He made Jerry do something he didn’t want to do. And, somehow, he he had managed to save Hillary’s job in the process.

In spite of her insanity, it seemed a lot of people liked Hillary. I was seemingly the only person in the office that didn’t like her, besides George. But we had encountered her instability on a far more visceral level than the others. So, there was that.

George didn’t spend much time around the sales zombies, mostly because of Hillary. And even on that day, when Hillary wasn’t present, he still stood on the periphery. I joined him.

“Wow. I should hire you guys to be my agents.”

“No, you should hire Shorty.”

“He’s something else. He was the reason I decided to go along with you when you guys dropped in to visit the other night–his little speech.” George waved at Shorty when he looked in our direction. Shorty smiled, and waved back. “I wanted to fuckin’ kill you.” We both laughed at that.

“Yeah, there’s been a lot of that going around lately.”

“I still can’t believe you did that for me, especially when you didn’t have any reason to do it.”

“That’s where you’re wrong, George. I had every reason to do it. According to Shorty, that’s what friends do.”

“So are we friends now?”

“I don’t know what else you could call it.”

We gave each other a big hug, and then, there she was. Randi started walking in our direction, and she only had eyes for me.

“I’ve gotta go.”

“You’d be a fool if you didn’t, my friend.”

That was a nice touch.

* * * *

“Hi, girls!” I said to Randi’s tits as she wrapped her arms around me. “Did you miss me?”

“Stop that!” she blushed, and playfully punched me in the ribs.

Good thing she was just playing around. I thought she’d broken a couple of my ribs. That fuckin’ hurt!

She took me to the Supply Room and we kissed and kissed and kissed and kissed.

“You’re not coming back, are you.” It wasn’t really a question. She already knew the answer. I shook my head, then held her close.

“I will never forget you.” I promised.

“You better not!” She had tears in her eyes, and fought them back.

And we kissed some more. She was a good kisser.

Her memories are safely filed away, and I know where to find them. I can still see her, if I try. Some parts of her are easier to see than others. I never told her that I loved her, but I probably did, and in a way, I love her still. Jerry was right about Randi.

She was a good girl.

* * * *

The only person we didn’t see at the office was Martha, she wasn’t feeling good, so she took the day off. Shorty got her number from one of the sales zombies, and called her. We jumped in the van, stopping to buy a case of beer on the way to replace all of the beer Shorty had consumed waiting for her to return Friday night, and drove to her apartment.

Man, Friday seemed like it had happened a lifetime ago, and in a way, it had been.

Martha was wearing a gray sweatsuit. She apologized for looking like such a mess. To be honest, she was pale, and looked about as tired as I felt, but she was as beautiful as ever to my eyes. She really was stunning. And yes, her apartment was totally darling.

She gave me a tour while Shorty stocked her fridge. We held hands as she guided me from room to room. It wasn’t a big apartment, so it was a short tour, ending in her darlingpreshadorbs bedroom.

It was the most enjoyable home tour I’ve ever had, and the only thing I could think was, Damn, why don’t you live in Jerry’s house? I wanted her to never let go of my hand. She turned to look at me, and we gazed into each other’s eyes for a time.

“I’m really sorry about the way everything turned out. I thought we’d get a chance to spend more…time.. together. I really wanted that.” That looked like true regret in Martha’s eyes to me, and if it wasn’t, she deserves an Oscar, too.

“Martha, my dear, you have no idea how much those words mean to me.” I gave her a kiss I hoped she would never forget, and she gave me one I have never forgotten.

“Hey,” Shorty said from the doorway. “You ready?” We broke off our embrace, but stood there holding hands for a moment.

I love you, Martha. I said, silently. A tear welled in her eye, then slowly trickled down her cheek.

* * * *

“Thanks for doing that.” I said to Shorty as he drove Martha’s car, looking for a salvage yard where we could get a rim for Martha’s car.

“I don’t know what you’re talking about.” he said. “You know she’s in love with me, right?”

“We’re all in love with you, Shorty. We all are.”

That’s probably true, now that I think of it. I don’t know anyone who knows Shorty that doesn’t love him, including Hillary.

I gave Shorty every cent I had because he had none. He replaced the tire and bent rim. That was the real reason we went to see Martha. Shorty had damaged her car, and he had promised he would fix it before he left.

I never saw Martha again. I stayed outside when Shorty returned her car keys. I wanted to remember her with that tear running down her angelic face. That’s how I see her most of the time, when she drops in to visit. I tell her funny stories, and she smiles. But Shorty was probably right. She was in love with him.

After buying the beer, the new tire, and a replacement rim, we had eighty-eight cents left in our pockets when we left Dallas.

But we had checked off every item on our list. All we needed to do was catch our flight.

* * * *

We gave the keys to the van to Bernie. He shook our hands, and thanked us once again for everything we had done.

Jerry took us to lunch, his treat. It was the least he could do.

“So, are you staying? Are you leaving? You know what I think you should do?” Jerry talked rapid fire, like a machine gun.

“I’m not staying. I’m going home. I need a vacation.”

“Good. You don’t want to stay here. This place would eat you alive. So, did you enjoy your stay? Did you have a good time?”

I think all I could do was shrug in response. The last couple of days had cast a pretty dark pall over all the days of light and good cheer that had preceded them. I had been kicking around the idea of relocating to Dallas, and that would’ve changed the outcome of my life forever.

“You’re something else, hippie.” Jerry said. He was smiling. “I really gotta stop calling you that. How about, hero.”

“No. Call me hippie. I like that better.”

“That’s what you are, you know. A fuckin’ hero. Right, Girtz?” Shorty had half a sandwich in his mouth, so he simply nodded and kept on eating. I didn’t have as much of an appetite as Shorty. I think he ate half of my sandwich, too.

“Listen to me. Do something with your life! You’ve got too much talent to be a fuckin’ bum! Use it! Become a doctor. Become a lawyer. No, don’t do that, lawyers suck! Thanks to you guys, my lawyers are having a field day! I don’t even want to think about the bill they’re gonna send me! I should make you pay half of it, Girtz!”

“Fuck you.” Shorty laughed. And we all did.

“Listen, I know I’ve said this before, but I was wrong about you guys, and I’m never wrong! You guys–you guys are… I don’t know what you are. I want to thank you for everything you did. That, was incredible. I still can’t believe you did that.”

“You’re welcome, Jerry.” I said.

“There! You see how he does that! Beautiful! Listen to me, me and Girtz, we’re just working stiffs. You, you kid, you got a real chance to make a difference! You could change the world if you get your head out of your ass! You follow me?”

“I hear what you’re saying, Jerry. I heard something a lot like this the other day.” and looked at Shorty, then Jerry.

“We talked.” Jerry said.

“Okay, we’re good now? How’re you guys doing on cash? You need anything for your trip?” Shorty and I looked at each other for a moment.

“Nope, we’re good.”

“You both still have my card, right?” Jerry asked. We nodded. “Well, this is me being fuckin’gracious and shit, and I mean this. If either of you ever need anything, call me.” We thanked Jerry, and shook his hand. “You fucked up, Girtz, you should’ve asked me to make you my partner. I would’ve done it. I’d make you a rich man…”

“Yeah, I thought about it, but I’m not a big city kind of guy. There are some things money can’t buy.”

“You’re a smart man, Girtz. C’mon, I gotta get back to work. There are some things money can buy, and I gotta make sure I can pay the bill.”

Yeah, that was the last time I saw Jerry. I kept his card for many years, even though I knew I’d never use it to call in any additional markers. I probably bought a new wallet, and decided not to hang onto his card anymore. But I wouldn’t be surprised if Shorty still has his. And he probably has the same wallet he had back then, held together by duct tape…

* * * *

Jerry had his chauffeur drive us to the airport. We arrived in plenty of time to catch our flight. We walked past several restaurant/bars on the way to our gate.

“You know what I think?” Shorty said. “I think we should have hit up Jerry for enough cash to buy a couple beers!”

* * * *

And that, finally concludes my epic story of our trip to Dallas. I’ve been to Dallas several times since my vacation with Shorty, but I never tried to contact any of the people I met during that time. I was married when I returned, and I doubt my lovely wife would have appreciated me trying to hook up with Randi or Martha.

I have nothing but fond memories of Randi, and a whole lots of what ifs when it comes to Martha.

I hope they’re both happy.

Shorty would continue his telephone relationship with Hillary, I was at his station more than once when she called. He would ask if I wanted to talk to her.

“Tell Randi and Martha I said hi.” was my response.

Based on those conversations, I do know something about her life. Jerry kept his promise to Shorty. He paid for all of her treatment. She got more better gooder, and stopped trying to kill George. She married Michael, and they had a baby girl. And then Hillary stopped calling.

I finally decided to stop hating her when I decided to quit drinking. I hope she’s happy, too. And her family.

I don’t think I was ever the same after Dallas. I took the advice of Shorty and Jerry, and went back to school. I became a surgical technician, then a nurse, and though I didn’t change the world, I have helped a few people change the way they looked at their worlds, and I’m content with that.

I might have taken the same path without going to Dallas, but the feedback I received from Jerry and Shorty had more impact on me than it would have had if not for what I just had experienced.

Dallas would get me pointed in a direction that led down a path, and though I would stumble and stray from it, I would find my way back. I’m walking that path firmly, and I have no intention of losing my way again, ever.

I’m much older now, and hopefully, wiser. In retrospect, you can’t be found unless you’re lost. It took me awhile, but I found myself, and I mostly really like the person I’ve become.

There’s a saying in Mexico, poco y poco. Little by little, that’s how you do it. It might take longer, but the results are worth it. Be patient.

Thank you for that, Dallas. Y’all were pretty good to me, in that regard.

But there are times when the sky is cloudy, and a chill is in the air. And if the planets line up, just so, I can see inside the barrel of that .38 again. And I can hear George pleading for his life, and I can feel my soul screaming in pain and heartache, and those times are not so good.

There are other times I wonder if was real. How much of this story is true? Any of it? Or was it all just a dream?

I know I touched bases with some old friends, touched some other bases with new friends, lost at least one friend. I met a whole lots of great people. I wonder if any of them remember me, or am I the only one that remembers this time?

That thought… always makes me feel lonely, and alone.

I have not held a revolver since that trip. I’ve had several friends and relatives show me their handguns, and tried to hand them to me, but I can’t do it.

I cannot do it.

I don’t know if that’s good or bad. My lovely wife thinks it’s a good thing, but she has her own issues related to gun violence, and when I decide to write again, maybe I’ll write about that.

I love writing. I’m sure I’ll do it again someday. But not today. Of tomorrow. Nor the day after. I’m taking a vacation. I’m going on a Mexican road trip.

What’s the Spanish word for BUMP?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s